Дайджест
8 Октября 2009 года

GLASNOST DEFENSE FOUNDATION DIGEST No. 447



TOPIC OF THE WEEK
Journalist harassed by “patriots”

EVENT OF THE WEEK

Igor Golembiovsky died

RUSSIA
1. Rostov Region. Popular newspaper’s office raided, computers stolen
2. Saratov. Three-way pressure on media
3. Republic of Karelia. State Duma deputies ready to break federal law?
4. Arkhangelsk. Historian threatened with prosecution for scientific research
5. Krasnodar Territory. “All Russia 2009” festival over

UKRAINE

ATV crew of reporters attacked in Odessa

GLASNOST DEFENSE FOUNDATION

Conflicts registered by GDF Monitoring Service on RF territory in September 2009

OUR PARTNERS
1. Joint statement by Russian PEN Center and GDF
2. Regional Press Institute holds opinion poll

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. News conference “Three Years Since Anna Politkovskaya’s Murder: Killers of Journalists in Russia Still At Large”
2. Rally in memory of Anna Politkovskaya




TOPIC OF THE WEEK

Journalist harassed by “patriots”


We have not seen anything of the kind ever since the times of the Soviet Union, where dissidents were persecuted as a norm. Now this practice is being revived in the Russian Federation …

It all began almost as a joke: some people claimed insulted by the name of a restaurant – Antisovetskaya (Anti-Soviet) – located across the street from Hotel “Sovetskaya” (Soviet). Actually, the place has been dubbed so for nearly thirty years, but in the USSR this name could never have become official for some very understandable reasons. A report to the district authorities followed, with a request to have “the anti-Soviet signboard” removed. Journalist Alexander Podrabinek wrote an article (see http://www.ej.ru/?a=note&id=9467 ) to express his own attitude towards the incident and the group of veterans who had initiated the action. It should be noted that the group included Vladimir Dolgikh, former secretary of the Communist Party Central Committee and alternate member of the CPSU CC Political Bureau, and most recently a member of the board of directors of the nickel-mining corporation “Norilsk Nickel”. He had fought as an army captain and been wounded during World War II.

It would seem there was nothing wrong about a journalist expressing his personal views in a publication. But then, some colleagues found A. Podrabinek’s article two harsh in its tonality and, quite normally, a few may have got hurt. In cases of this kind, people in civilized countries go to court to have their conflicts settled, and no one would ever be surprised to see things developing that way in Russia as well.

But they did not.

To begin with, activists of the movement Nashi [a national-patriotic movement positioning itself as a youth wing of the ruling United Russia Party; its name, the possessive pronoun “our”, bears in Russian some generalizing connotations that turn the word into a unity-suggesting notion like “the guys on our side”. Also see below: “nashisty”, or “nascists” – a pun built on the pattern of the word “fashisty”, meaning “fascists” – Translator.] launched a persecution campaign against Podrabinek, “pouring torrents of dirt and threats on him in the Internet”, according to his wife, Alla. Then a group of “nascists” came into the office of Novaya Gazeta, a newspaper for which A. Podrabinek works as a freelance reporter, and demanded his extradition. Naturally, they were told to get the hell out. That is when they decided to stage a permanent picketing action outside the apartment block where the journalist lives, and easily got an official authorization for the action. On several occasions, they tried to storm into Alexander’s apartment and called him on the phone “to express their indignation”. Their proclaimed goal was to “make Podrabinek either apologize or emigrate from Russia”; otherwise they would “see to it that his life is divided into two phases – pre-publication and post-publication”. In the process, they claimed they were not threatening anyone. While continuing the picketing action, the “nascists” began gathering signatures under an appeal to the Prosecutor General’s Office to institute criminal proceedings against Podrabinek. Finally, they lodged legal claims against the journalist and the Ekho Moskvy (Moscow Echo) radio station that had reported details of the persecution campaign waged against their colleague.

The international journalistic organizations “Reporters sans Frontieres”, the Committee to Protect Journalists and the Polish Journalists’ Association have already protested and demanded an immediate end to the harassment campaign against Podrabinek. Many Russian journalists, too, have expressed solidarity with their colleague. The Glasnost Defense Foundation is ready to offer Alexander any legal or other assistance he may need. “You may disagree with Podrabinek, you may feel angry or offended, but to start harassing him for his writings is a mean and dirty thing to do,” GDF President Alexei Simonov commented. In his turn, Russia’s Human Rights Ombudsman Vladimir Lukin has said that Nashi activists break the law by placing pickets outside Podrabinek’s house, and urged the law enforcers to look at the situation closely.

However, the authorities are in no hurry to act; it looks as if they are favoring a revitalization of the practice of directing well-controlled waves of “popular anger” against persons daring to express other than officially approved viewpoints.

P.S. One may wonder: would some other group of veterans (for example, former prisoners of conscience) succeed in demanding that some pro-Soviet signboard be removed?

____________

EVENT OF THE WEEK

Igor Golembiovsky died

Igor Golembiovsky died. He was a journalist, editor-in-chief of the national daily Izvestia and a board member of the Glasnost Defense Foundation at a time when being on the board was an act of honor and readiness to defend justice.

Together with Egor Yakovlev, they represented all of Russia’s print media on the GDF board. That was a time when there was an efficiently working Club of Editors-in-Chief, of which Igor Golembiovsky was president.

Igor was a man of convictions and a reliable comrade-in-arms in our fight against arbitrariness. He was a pioneer of Russia’s independent press; pioneers and trailblazers are sometimes prone to err, but one thing is sure: he made the independent Izvestia Russia’s single best newspaper.

For the past few years Golembiovsky was down with a severe disease and lonely; the latter was partially our fault, too. Forgive us, Igor. May your memory live forever.

_____________

RUSSIA

1. Rostov Region. Popular newspaper’s office raided, computers stolen


By Anna Lebedeva,
GDF staff correspondent in Southern Federal District

Coming to work early on October 1, the staffers of the newspaper Yug Time in Novocherkassk saw parts of their computers scattered around the office. Unknown criminals had taken to pieces the system units and carried away storage devices, CDs with licensed software, and hard discs with all the information stored on them. The office door had not been broken and the locks had not been damaged.

“The police maintain the burglars came in through the balcony,” editor Irina Sycheva says. “But the ground-floor offices are occupied by firms equipped with much more sophisticated computers. Yet someone needed our own, old and worn-out, PCs. Maybe the goal was to disrupt the release of the next issue or settle one’s scores with our newspaper. Fortunately, we copied one issue a week ago, which will be facilitating the make-up process until we have our software packages restored.”

Journalists have advanced several versions, not ruling out an attack by competitors: the city’s media market is pretty cramped, with six newspapers released here already; and the relatively new newspaper Yug Time is printed in 11,500 copies, which is an impressive circulation for a city as small as Novocherkassk.


2. Saratov. Three-way pressure on media

By Yuri Chernyshov,
GDF staff correspondent in Volga Federal District

In Saratov, this month may be fraught with major scandals around legal claims brought against local media by high-ranking members of the regional branch of the United Russia Party (URP).

The city arbitration court has been busy since September 29 considering a legal claim lodged by Nikolai Kuznetsov, rector of Saratov State Agricultural Univestiry (SGAU), against Svetlana Luka, editor-in-chief and director of the newspaper Krestyansky Dvor, and Boris Dmitriyev, a reporter for the newspaper Saratovsky Vzglyad, in connection with a publication (carried by the second and reprinted by the first-named newspaper) that the rector saw as damaging his reputation and inflicting an aggregate loss of RUR 11,500,000 on his university. And on September 30, the regional branch of United Russia filed, as it had earlier promised to, a legal claim against Ivan Bryantsev, former PR and Ethnic Policy Minister of the Saratov Region, and Tatyana Nikitina, a staff correspondent of the newspaper Kommersant. The URP wants its reputation to be protected and claims RUR 1,000,000 in moral damage compensation, payable in equal shares by the two defendants, for carrying a local Jewish community leader’s appeal to the regional URP leaders to put an end to what were described as “anti-Semitic” publications. For details, see GDF Digest No. 446, “Interethnic Concord Starts to Crack” (http://www.gdf.ru/lenta/item/1/650 ).

Saratov-based media have pointed to three strange features in the rector’s legal claim: one, Kuznetsov wants the damage done by one and the same publication to be compensated twice; two, the university only came to realize its material losses a whole six months after the publication; and three, the claimed compensation amount is for some reason tied to the number of students and the cost of education at SGAU: allegedly, the media are to blame for the university’s failure to get the target number of students enrolled and thereby earn as much as it had planned. Commenting on that, Saratovsky Vzglyad says: “We have carried several stories describing the SGAU management’s performance, but only one of those caused rector Kuznetsov’s indignation. Other critical publications, including those about extortion of money from applicants and students, were left by the university managers unnoticed. Does this mean Mr. Kuznetsov fully acknowledges the facts cited?” Evidently, he does, concludes the newspaper, particularly considering the fact that “the prosecutor’s office of Saratov has canceled as unlawful the regional Investigations Committee’s refusal to institute criminal proceedings against SGAU top managers”.

One is bound to agree that other Vzglyad publications may indeed have diverted the flow of applications to the agricultural university. Specifically, one story said: “Applicants have been urged by faculty members to write one more application, in the rector’s name, about the transfer of RUR 12,000 to the university bank account in charity assistance to the educational institution. That guaranteed unhindered admission to SGAU.” Alexei Kolobrodov, editor of Obshchestvennoye Mneniye magazine, who at one time was accused of “vandalism’ for taking part as a journalist in posting leaflets of the student association “Self-Defense” on university premises and the church-sanctified monument to Cyril and Methodius outside the main entrance, has commented: “This three-way pressure on Saratov journalists and media by the local URP branch (the rectors of SGAU and Saratov State University are members of the party’s regional political council, and Pankov is the URP curator in the Southern Federal District) makes one think of a deliberate campaign to get rid of undesirable media representatives in the region.”
 

3. Republic of Karelia. State Duma deputies ready to break federal law?

By Anatoly Tsygankov,
GDF staff correspondent in North-Western Federal District

Next Sunday, Karelia will be electing heads and deputies of local administrations. In the run-up to the election, attempts have been made at different levels of Russian government, including in Moscow, to interfere with the local election campaign. Evidently tired of all those telephone “recommendations”, Leonid Khozin, editor of Moskovsky Komsomolets v Karelii, has published a story about his “advisors” from the number of United Russia (URP) representatives insisting that his newspaper refrain from touching upon some themes that Russia’s ruling party finds unfit for public discussion.

After each publication containing at least slight criticism of E. Braginova, leader of the Prionezhsky District branch of United Russia who is running for the head of district administration, the editor would receive a phone call advising him against featuring anything of the kind in his newspaper in the future. After a series of calls from URP representatives, he had a threatening phone call warning him that he would have problems with the police unless he “forgot candidate Braginova’s name altogether”.

Yet the newspaper once again returned to the problems facing residents of the Prionezhsky District and criticized again the poor performance of Braginova, then head of the Novogilovsky Village administration. That triggered a totally unexpected phone call – from the RF State Duma. A colleague of Valentina Pivnenko, a State Duma deputy representing Karelia in the Russian Parliament, took the liberty of “advising” the editor once again which topics were tabooed. According to L. Khozin, the conversation was polite in its form but totally inadmissible in terms of its content – anything a law-abiding Duma member would think twice before saying. The guy (whose name is not disclosed in the newspaper story) went as far as suggesting pre-printing censorship should be introduced. With the very first reference to the federal Media Law, however, the parliamentarian proved smart enough to hang up.
 
Earlier, high-ranking politicians had warned the Moscow office of Moskovsky Komsomolets to give its regional branch in Karelia a good dressing-down. It was after it became obvious that the Moscow and Petrozavodsk-based politicians would not leave his newspaper alone that L. Khozin signed the newspaper story for printing…


4. Arkhangelsk. Historian threatened with prosecution for scientific research

By Tamara Ovchinnikova,
GDF staff correspondent in North-Western Federal District

Charges of “gathering and disseminating confidential and personal information” have been brought against Mikhail Suprun, head of the National History Department at Pomorsky State University, and Alexander Dudarev, a colonel of the Arkhangelsk Region Interior Ministry Department, in connection with their involvement in the scientific research project “Russia-Born Ethnic Germans Subjected to Repression in the 1940s”.

The regional FSB department has searched the two men’s homes and work places, confiscating computers and other electronic carriers, and some archives, including Russian historical documents brought by Suprun from U.S. and European archives in 1999.

“Clearly, the whole thing is absurd. Memory books of this kind have been published in different areas since the early years of perestroika – as a rule, at the prosecutor’s office’s initiative. This said, why not bring similar charges against those prosecutors and authors of each ‘memory book’?” Suprun commented.

The above-mentioned research project and its follow-up part, “German POWs in Russia’s North”, have been implemented on the basis an agreement signed by the head of Germany’s Red Cross; the chief of the Arkhangelsk Region Interior Ministry Department; and the rector of Pomorsky State University. The contractors for each party are Dr. Anton Bosch, chair of the Russian Germans’ Society in Germany; Col. Alexander Dudarev; and National History Department head Mikhail Suprun, respectively. 
[Based on Dvina-Inform news agency reports]


5. Krasnodar Territory. “All Russia 2009” festival over

By Natalia Severskaya,
GDF staff correspondent in Central Federal District

The 14th international journalists’ festival “All Russia 2009” was held in Dagomys on September 25-October 30, bringing together over 1,000 journalists from across Russia and many guests from other ex-Soviet and foreign countries.

The festival program included a variety of events that drew considerable attention. A round table with Novaya Gazeta editor D. Muratov discussed problems facing investigative journalists. Regional media editors held a session of the business club “Media Supervising Practices” to meet with S. Sitnikov, head of the Federal Service for Public Communications and Information Technology Oversight. The events organized by the Young Journalists’ League were mediated by V. Chelyshev, deputy editor-in-chief of Zhurnalist magazine. P. Voshchanov, I. Petrovskaya and Y. Zasursky held master classes in journalism, and there was a meeting with Y. Baturin, a cosmonaut and member of the Russian Journalists’ Union.

A separate meeting, “A Debt of Memory and Wrath”, commemorated journalists killed while doing their professional work. Speakers pointed to the still outstanding problem of impunity. The participants were shown a documentary, “The Interrupted Flight”, about journalists killed in Dagestan at different times. Commenting on the film, A. Kamalov, head of the Dagestan Journalists’ Union, said that an undeclared war has been waged in the republic between the corrupt authorities and honest citizens; over the past 15 years the lives of eleven journalists have been lost in that war.

Of particular interest was a debate between journalists and judges mediated by Leonid Nikitinsky, an observer for Novaya Gazeta and a secretary of the Russian Journalists’ Union. The discussion involved Supreme Court chairmen from five constituent entities of the Russian Federation.

The festival program also included two jubilee presentations honoring RJU Secretary M. A. Fedotov and GDF President A. K. Simonov. Aidan White, General Secretary of the International Federation of Journalists, presented his book “Telling the Whole Truth”; Leonid Levin, a journalist, editor and publisher, his new book “A Life Story Told with a Smile, or a Karabas-Barabas from Yakutia”; and GDF President Alexei Simonov, his book “A Guy from Sivtsev Vrazhek”.

Commenting on program events, many participants stressed that the festival had given them the opportunity not only to attend lectures delivered by prominent journalists, judges, scientists and politicians but also meet with them personally to ask questions and hear their replies.

_____________

UKRAINE

ATV crew of reporters attacked in Odessa

While the District Administrative Court in Odessa was holding hearings of a legal claim lodged by the National Council for TV and Radio Broadcasting against the television company ATV, two journalists of the latter company were attacked and wounded, the Ukrainian news agency Revizor has reported.

ATV reporter Olesya Klintsova was hit on the head, and cameraman Dmitry Dokunov was attacked by an unidentified man who cut Dmitry’s arm with a knife badly and broke his camera.

The incident occurred during the September 29 rally outside the District Administrative Court that had attracted both ATV supporters from the number of ordinary citizens and its opponents from the ranks of Ukrainian nationalists favoring the stripping of the TV company of its broadcasting license.

The National TV/Radio Council is pressing for the ATV closure because of its sharp-worded criticism of the nationalists as well as municipal and national authorities, and its calls for better relations with Russia. According to Lenta.ru, Council officials are accusing the TV network of its “anti-Ukrainian” position and “attempts to fan inter-ethnic differences”.

_____________

GLASNOST DEFENSE FOUNDATION

Conflicts registered by GDF Monitoring Service on RF territory in September 2009

Attacks on journalists – 2 (Mikhail Afanasyev, editor-in-chief, web magazine Novy Fokus, Khakassia; Mikhail Gorin, executive secretary, newspaper Argumenty I Fakty, St. Petersburg).

Attacks on media offices – 1 (Zlat-TV channel, Chelyabinsk Region).

Instances of censorship – 4 (Interfax news agency, Khakassia; media in Chechen Republic; Elf magazine, Petrozavodsk, Karelia; Channel Five, St. Petersburg).

Criminal charges against journalists and media – 5 (Alexei Nikiforov, editor, YekaterinburgNEWS.ru website, Yekaterinburg; Marina Shishkina, dean, School of Journalism, St. Petersburg University; Yevgeny Gorchakov, editor-in-chief, newspaper Krasnoye Znamya, Komi Republic; Robert Zagreyev, editor, independent newspaper Za Mestnoye Samoupravleniye, Republic of Bashkortostan; Airat Dilmukhametov, editor, opposition newspaper Maidan, Republic of Bashkortostan).

Illegal sacking of editors/journalists – 2 (Galina Musalnikova, editor, newspaper Rezhevskaya Vest, Sverdlovsk Region; Valentin Zhivulin, editor, newspaper Voskhod, Sverdlovsk Region).

Legal claims against journalists and media, registered – 22, worth a total of RUR 40,653,000.

Earlier claims against journalists and media, considered – 4, satisfied – 3, total amount of moral damage compensation charged – RUR 653,000.

Denial of access to information (including bans on audio/video recording and photography; denials of accreditation; restrictions on visits to or presence at events held in government agencies, at industrial enterprises, in state institutions, etc.) – 14.

Threats to journalists and media outlets – 13 (Veronica Kozlova, NTV reporter, Moscow; Mikhail Voitenko, editor-in-chief, Morskoy Byulleten-SovFrakht magazine, Moscow; Iskander Kuzeyev, freelance reporter, Moscow; Sulaiman Uladiyev, director, State TV/Radio Company “Dagestan”, Khadzhimurat Kamalov, publisher, newspaper Chernovik, Nadira Isayeva, editor-in-chief, newspaper Chernovik, Artur Mamayev and Timur Mustafayev, reporters for newspaper Chernovik, Natalia Krainova, journalist, Novoye Delo weekly, Zaur Gaziyev, reporter, newspaper Svobodnaya Respublika, Akhmednabi Akhmednabiyev, correspondent for Caucasian Knot news agency, and Zubair Zabairuyev, freelance reporter, all threatened in Makhachkala, Dagestan; Alexander Podrabinek, Yezhednevny Zhurnal magazine, Moscow).

Refusal to print (or distribute) media – 2 (newspaper Islamsky Krai, Krasnoyarsk; newspaper Golos Sharyi, Kostroma Region).

Media outlets closed – 2 (newspaper Orlovsky Vestnik, Orel; newspaper Moi Gorod Bez Tsenzury, Khanti-Mansi Autonomous District).

Interference with web publications – 11 (website of State TV/Radio Company “Sankt-Peterburg”, St. Petersburg; website of Morskoy Byulleten-SovFrakht magazine, Moscow; website of RosKosmos space agency; website Lenta.ru; website of Solidarity Movement; website of Kamchatka Region Investigations Committee under RF Prosecutor General’s Office; website Gazeta.ru; website of Ingushetia Interior Ministry; website of Verstov.info news agency, Chelyabinsk Region; website Bashne.net; website “Chechenskaya Respublika Segodnya”).

Confiscation of, or damage to, photo/video/audio equipment and computers – 4.

Media driven from leased premises – 1 (Elf magazine, Petrozavodsk, Karelia).

Other forms of pressure and infringement of journalists’ rights – 30.

***

Last week, the Glasnost Defense Foundation was referred to at least 15 times in the Internet, particularly at:

http://www.echo.msk.ru/news/623455-echo.html
http://www.ej.ru/?a=note&id=9493
http://www.volganet.ru/irj/avo.html?NavigationTarget=ROLES://portal_content/News/news_print_form&guid=/guid/f0fb07c7-618e-2c10-e693-8576b349cd37
http://www.volganet.ru/irj/avo.html?NavigationTarget=ROLES://portal_content/News/news_print_form&guid=/guid/c0680cc7-618e-2c10-72aa-91a8a6089680
http://www.lenta.cjes.ru/?m=9&y=2009&lang=rus&nid=13803
http://echo.msk.ru/news/623534-echo.html
http://prima-news.ru/rnews-1763.html
http://www.silver.ru/news/3878/
http://obzor.westsib.ru/news/307565
http://www.novayagazeta.ru/data/2009/110/19.html
http://www.gazetanv.ru/archive/article/?id=6005
http://www.gazetanv.ru/archive/article/?id=6004

______________

OUR PARTNERS

1. Joint statement by Russian PEN Center and GDF


The Glasnost Defense Foundation, an organization defending journalists’ independence, and the Russian PEN Center supporting the freedom of literary activities, hereby declare that they are opposed to the persecution campaign being waged against the prominent human rights activist, former prisoner of conscience and journalist Alexander Podrabinek.

A. Podrabinek has openly announced his negative attitude to the attributes of Sovietism and to people favoring those. If at a time of zero glasnost the word “anti-Soviet” was well known and openly used, how can it possibly be banned today, at a time of full glasnost – not even as the name of a restaurant that ever since Soviet times has been dubbed “Anti-Sovetskaya” for the simple reason of its being located across the street from Hotel “Sovetskaya”? In Soviet Russia, with its GULAG rule, people were generally divided into two groups – prison inmates and prison guards, i.e., people who resisted the regime and those who deliberately or unwittingly supported it. People turned into “labor camp dust” did not give birth to any children; the children of those on the other side of the barbed wire are now freely picketing the homes of persons whom their fathers used to watch. While favoring a unified look at Russia’s history, one should remember that this kind of unification can only be achieved if the full truth about our history is known. The latest developments around Podrabinek show that GULAG-style attitudes, not fully uprooted at one time, are again beginning to sprout today.

We hereby urge Russia’s government, President and law enforcement bodies to secure Alexander Podrabinek’s constitutional right to think differently and express his views publicly. We join the numerous protests by the “anti-Soviet-minded” public activists who have expressed their solidarity with the former prisoner of Soviet labor camps.

PEN Center Executive Committee
Alexei K. Simonov, President, Glasnost Defense Foundation


2. Regional Press Institute holds opinion poll

The Regional Press Institute and Glasnost Defense Foundation hereby invite media journalists and editors to read the European Charter of Regional or Ethnic Minority Languages (the full Russian-language version is available at http://www.terralegis.org/terra/act/e474.html), adopted by the Council of Europe on November 5, 1992, and answer the question: “If you were to decide, based on Article 11 of the RF Media Law, whether or not the Charter should be ratified, what would be your decision?” Please explain your voting choice.

Your replies are welcome at: asharogr@yandex.ru

____________

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1. News conference “Three Years Since Anna Politkovskaya’s Murder: Killers of Journalists in Russia Still At Large”

A news conference, “Three Years Since Anna Politkovskaya’s Murder: Killers of Journalists in Russia Still At Large”, will be held at Moscow’s Independent Press Center (17/9, Prechistenka St.) at noon on October 6.

The conference will be attended by Jean-Francois Julliard, general secretary of Reporters Without Borders; Ilya and Vera Politkovsky, son and daughter of A. Politkovskaya; Dmitry Muratov, editor-in-chief of Novaya Gazeta; and Anna Stavitskaya, the Politkovsky family’s lawyer.

Contact phone: (+7 495) 232 2891.


2. Rally in memory of Anna Politkovskaya

A mourning rally will be held near the monument to A. Griboyedov in Moscow’s Chistoprudny Boulevard at 4:03 p.m. on October 7 to honor the memory of Anna Politkovskaya.
 
_____________________________________________________________________________

This Digest has been prepared by the Glasnost Defense Foundation (GDF), http://www.gdf.ru.

We appreciate the support of the John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.
Digest released once a week, on Mondays, since August 11, 2000.
Distributed by e-mail to 1,600 subscribers in and outside Russia.

Editor-in-chief: Alexei Simonov

Editorial board: Boris Timoshenko – Monitoring Service chief, Pyotr Polonitsky – head of GDF regional network, Svetlana Zemskova – lawyer, Vsevolod Shelkhovskoy – translator, Alexander Efremov – web administrator in charge of Digest distribution.


We would appreciate reference to our organization in the event of any Digest-sourced information or other materials being used.

Contacts: Glasnost Defense Foundation, 4, Zubovsky Boulevard, Office 432, 119992 Moscow, Russia.
Telephone/fax: (495) 637-4947, 637-4420, e-mail: boris@gdf.ru, fond@gdf.ru
To be crossed out from the Digest list of subscribers, please e-mail a note to fond@gdf.ru .

Все новости

Архив
ФЗГ продолжает бороться за свое честное имя. Пройдя все необходимые инстанции отечественного правосудия, Фонд обратился в Европейский суд. Для обращения понадобилось вкратце оценить все, что Фонд сделал за 25 лет своего существования. Вот что у нас получилось:
Полезная деятельность Фонда защиты гласности за 25 лет его жизни